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Important News!

Greetings guys and gals, today I have some very important news to give to you all. As of tomorrow I will be taking a break from this blog for about a month or two. This is due to lack of technology for the next few months.

I will try as hard as I can to post or at least reblog something, but I doubt that I will.

I hope that you guys and gals understand. But please keep in mind that I’m not doing this because I’m lazy or that I don’t care much about this blog. far from it!

Thank you for understanding and for keeping me doing this for so long, and I hope to post something again here at the Alfred Hitchcock Tribute blog.  

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trappedinamentalhell said: Opinions on the shot-for-shot remake of Psycho? Oh and I used to have you added on facebook until I got banned, extremely happy your blog popped up in my suggestions!

horroroftruant:

Hey man! If you ever get back on Facebook you can add my new profile here. I’ve been banned more times than I can count myself… nonetheless… 

I hated the Psycho remake, but a lot of that had little to do with it being a shot-for-shot retread of the Hitchcock classic, believe it or not. I thought the film was badly miscast, and the performances were extremely wooden; Vince Vaughn pretty much rushed through Anthony Perkins’ lines and generally looked like he didn’t give a shit. Likewise, Gus Van Sant rushed through all the shots that Hitchcock savored in the original. I generally enjoy Van Sant’s films (Drugstore Cowboy is one of my favorite movies of all time), but I can’t really think of anything I enjoyed about this movie whatsoever. To me, it’s the ultimate textbook example of how not to remake a classic horror film.

I could’t agree with you more Truant!

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Kim Novak as Madeline Elster/Judy Barton in Vertigo (1958)

Kim Novak as Madeline Elster/Judy Barton in Vertigo (1958)

(Source: 1428-elm-street)

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hitchcockandfriends:

"Young and Innocent," 1937. Based on the Josephine Tey novel "A Shilling for Candles," this oddly titled drama stars Nova Pilbeam as a young woman trying to clear the name of her wrongly accused boyfriend, very much like "Stage Fright." It’s episodic in the style of "The 39 Steps" or "Saboteur," and features a couple of memorable set pieces: The car sinking into a cavern while its occupants barely escape, and the incredible crane shot from the hotel lobby to the drummer in the band. Not the best of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1930s British films, but very memorable nonetheless.

hitchcockandfriends:

"Young and Innocent," 1937. Based on the Josephine Tey novel "A Shilling for Candles," this oddly titled drama stars Nova Pilbeam as a young woman trying to clear the name of her wrongly accused boyfriend, very much like "Stage Fright." It’s episodic in the style of "The 39 Steps" or "Saboteur," and features a couple of memorable set pieces: The car sinking into a cavern while its occupants barely escape, and the incredible crane shot from the hotel lobby to the drummer in the band. Not the best of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1930s British films, but very memorable nonetheless.

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hitchcockandfriends:

Here’s that amazing crane shot across the hotel lobby to the drummer from “Young and Innocent.” Sometimes I think Alfred Hitchcock created this shot just to show off to American producers, as he was trying to land a deal to move to Hollywood at the time. 

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hitchcockandfriends:

"The Lady Vanishes," 1939. My favorite film directed by Alfred Hitchcock in the 1930s, it starts in the snowbound mountains of a fictional European nation and veers into a long train ride into hostile territory, hitting many of Hitchcock’s pet concerns along the way. The two cricket-obsessed lingerie salesman who are forced to share a bed were so popular they went on to star in their own films, radio shows and even a TV series. Dame May Whitty is one of the most delightful older women in any Hitchcock film, and she gets to do some wonderfully silly things like outrun gunfire and whistle a tune that somehow carries the secret clause in a treaty. Probably the most whimsical film Hitchcock ever made. 

The Lady Vanishes (1939), Hitchcock’s most famous British film.

hitchcockandfriends:

"The Lady Vanishes," 1939. My favorite film directed by Alfred Hitchcock in the 1930s, it starts in the snowbound mountains of a fictional European nation and veers into a long train ride into hostile territory, hitting many of Hitchcock’s pet concerns along the way. The two cricket-obsessed lingerie salesman who are forced to share a bed were so popular they went on to star in their own films, radio shows and even a TV series. Dame May Whitty is one of the most delightful older women in any Hitchcock film, and she gets to do some wonderfully silly things like outrun gunfire and whistle a tune that somehow carries the secret clause in a treaty. Probably the most whimsical film Hitchcock ever made. 

The Lady Vanishes (1939), Hitchcock’s most famous British film.

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silverscreams:

THE LODGER, 1927.

silverscreams:

THE LODGER, 1927.

(Source: monsterserial)

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This guy is awesome, even when he’s drunk!

(Source: fred---astaire, via thebarsofhisplight)

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Kim Novak in Vertigo (1958)

Kim Novak in Vertigo (1958)

(Source: 1428-elm-street)

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Cary Grant signs autographs for some fans on the set of To Catch A Thief, 1955.
Cary Grant signs autographs for some fans on the set of To Catch A Thief, 1955.

(Source: archiesleach, via in-love-with-the-1950s)